Month: July 2017

Signs your Parent Needs Help

Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance is not easy for people as they age. The responsibility often falls on family members to recognize the signs that an aging loved one might need support with completing daily living tasks.

How do you know if it is time for in-home care? Here are many of the red flags you should be looking for.

  • Difficulty keeping track of time
  • Sleeping for most of the day
  • Poor diet or weight loss
  • Loss of interest in hobbies and activities
  • Changes in mood or extreme mood swings
  • Difficulty getting up from a seated position
  • Difficulty with walking, balance and mobility
  • Unexplained bruising or injuries
  • Marks or wear on walls, door jams, furniture and other items being used to help with stability while walking through the home
  • Uncertainty and confusion when performing once-familiar tasks
  • Forgetfulness, including forgetting to take medications or taking incorrect dosages
  • Missing important appointments
  • Consistent use of poor judgment (e.g. falling for scams or sales pitches, giving away money)
  • Changes in Personal Hygiene
  • Neglecting Household Responsibilities
  • Unpleasant body odor
  • Infrequent showering (/Articles/elderly-parents-who-wont-shower-or-change-clothes-133877.htm) or bathing
  • A strong smell of urine in the house or on clothing
  • Noticeable decline in grooming habits and personal care (e.g. unkempt hair, untrimmed nails, lack of oral care, wearing dirty or
  • stained clothing)
  • Little or no fresh, healthy food in the fridge
  • Dirty house and/or extreme clutter (/Articles/How-Do-I-Get-Dad-to-Move-Out-of-His-Cluttered-Unsafe-Home-133954.htm)
  • Dirty laundry piling up
  • Stains or wet spots on furniture or carpet
  • Spoiled food that doesn’t get thrown away
  • Stacks of unopened mail or an overflowing mailbox
  • Late payment notices, bounced checks and calls from bill collectors
  • Utilities being turned off due to missed payments
  • Unexplained dents

If these signs are present, it doesn’t necessarily mean a move to assisted living or a nursing home is required. However, these red flags do indicate that daily supportive care is needed.  Home Care One has the professional team needed to assist families during these sometimes difficult transitions.  If you or a loved one are in need of support please call us today.  800-781-6004

10 Benefits of Tai Chi for Seniors

Tai Chi for seniors: There are a number of benefits for seniors that practice Tai Chi . Tai Chi only requires about 20 minutes a day and is a low-impact, relaxing type of exercise.  Tai Chi is an internal Chinese martial art in the sense that it focuses on mental and spiritual aspects integrated into movement.  This meditative form of exercise consists of a series of 19 movements and one pose.

Here are 10 benefits of Tai Chi for seniors:

  1. Relieves the physical effects of stress
  2. Reduces bone loss in menopausal women
  3. Improves lower body and leg strength
  4. Helps with arthritis pain
  5. Reduces blood pressure
  6. Accumulates energy by releasing endorphins
  7. Enhances mental capacity and concentration
  8. Improves balance and stability by strengthening ankles and knees
  9. Promotes faster recovery from strokes and heart attacks
  10. Improves conditions of Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis, and Parkinson’s

Many senior care facilities and community centers offer Tai Chi classes not only because of the extensive health benefits but also because it does not require any equipment or furniture.  Many seniors find it an easy activity and a peaceful environment in which to meet other seniors with common interests.

There are several locations in South Florida that offer Thai Chi classes.  Google “thai chi near me” to find options close to you.

How Cardiac Rehabilitation Can Help Heal Your Heart

If you have a heart attack or other heart problem, cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is an important part of your recovery. Cardiac rehab can help prevent another, perhaps more serious, heart attack and can help you build heart-healthy habits. Learn more about who needs cardiac rehab and how it can help your recovery.

What is cardiac rehabilitation?

Cardiac rehab is a program for someone recovering from a heart attack, heart failure, or other heart problem that required surgery or medical care.

Cardiac rehab is a supervised program that includes physical activity, education about healthy living, including healthy eating, and counseling to find ways to relieve stress and improve mental health.  You may seek assistance from your health care team, which includes exercise and nutrition specialists, physical therapists, and counselors or mental health professionals.  These may be in hospital or in-home services depending on the patients needs.

Who needs cardiac rehabilitation?

Anyone who has had a heart problem, such as a heart attack, heart failure, or heart surgery, can benefit from cardiac rehab. Studies have found that cardiac rehab helps men and women, people of all ages, and people with mild, moderate, and severe heart problems.

But certain people are less likely to go to or finish a cardiac rehab program. These include:

  • Women. Studies show that women, especially minority women, are less likely than men to go to or complete a cardiac rehab program.  This may be because doctors may be less likely to suggest cardiac rehab to women.
  • Older adults. Older adults are also less likely to join a cardiac rehab program following a heart problem.  They may think they are unable to do the physical activity because of their age, or they may have other conditions that can make exercising harder, such as arthritis. This makes cardiac rehabilitation especially useful for older adults, since it can improve strength and mobility to help make daily tasks easier.

One of the benefits of cardiac rehab is building healthier habits, such as finding a physical activity that you enjoy, to help you stay heart-healthy for life.

How does cardiac rehab help?

Cardiac rehabilitation has many benefits to your health in both the short and long-term, including:

  • Strengthening your heart and body after a heart attack.
  • Relieving symptoms of heart problems, such as chest pain.
  • Building healthier habits, including getting more physical activity, quitting smoking, and eating a heart-healthy diet. A nutritionist or dietitian may work with you to help you limit foods with unhealthy fats and eat more fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber.
  • Reducing stress.
  • Improving your mood. People are more likely to feel depressed after a heart attack. Cardiac rehab can help prevent and lessen depression.
  • Increasing your energy and strength, making daily activities easier, such as carrying groceries and climbing stairs.
  • Making you more likely to take your prescribed medicines that help lower your risk for future heart problems.
  • Preventing future heart problems and death. Studies have found that cardiac rehab decreases the chances you will die in the five years following a heart attack or bypass surgery by around 20% to 30%

Where can I get the care needed?

Some programs are done in a hospital or rehabilitation center, while some programs can be done in the patient’s home. Cardiac rehab may start while you are still in the hospital or right after you leave the hospital.

Cardiac rehab programs usually last about three months but can range anywhere from two to eight months.  If you or a loved one in South Florida need in home care please call Home Care One.

Source: CDC